North Carolina rejects temporary rule discouraging use of low-e windows

The North Carolina Rules Review Commission has rejected the temporary rule, which allowed permit holders to opt-out of using low-e fenestration products in residential construction.

In an Aug. 8, 2014 letter to the North Carolina Building Code Council, the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) led a coalition of industry organizations including the Glass Association of North America (GANA), the Insulating Glass Manufacturers Alliance (IGMA) and the Window & Door Manufacturers Association (WDMA) in conveying that the Emergency Rulemaking was established utilizing inaccurate information and that the required criteria for issuing this rule had not been satisfied.The letter specifically stated that the use of low-e windows significantly improves building envelope energy efficiency.Low-e windows are now used in millions of homes throughout the country and continue to contribute to lowering consumer’s energy bills and helping conserve energy.

The letter elaborated on the energy efficiency of low-e fenestration products in the state. “North Carolina has been a longtime leader in adopting and advancing residential and commercial building energy codes that reduce energy dependence. The use of low-e glass has played a key role in reducing energy use in North Carolina and across the country. Low-e glass has been used safely as an integral part of construction projects for decades and continues to grow in popularity, because it provides comfort and value. It works and it works well.”

“This is an important victory for our industry, both in North Carolina and in any state or jurisdiction that values the energy efficiency that today’s fenestration products offer to consumers. AAMA sincerely thanks all of the members and industry representatives who worked together to ensure this outcome,” says Rich Walker, AAMA’s president and CEO.

The North Carolina Building Code Council stated that they will not attempt to issue additional temporary rules regarding this matter.

“We must remain ever vigilant, however, because the North Carolina Building Code Council will return to this subject later this year, when they start development of a permanent rule,” adds Walker.

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600450 North Carolina rejects temporary rule discouraging use of low-e windows glassonweb.com
Date: 1 October 2014
Source: AAMA

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