The crack as a tool

We encounter glass everywhere – as window and facade glazing, coffee-table tops and shelving. A new process makes it possible to cut the brittle material cost-efficiently and opens up new applications thanks to superior edge quality.

Glass is a versatile, popular material for a wide range of applications. Cutting the glass is key to obtaining high-quality products. In the conventional process used to cut flat glass, a small cutter wheel scores a line into the glass. Pressure is then applied to the glass along this line so that it breaks. Unfortunately, glass splinters may come off in the process, producing defects known as micro-cracks. The glass consequently needs to be reworked by grinding and polishing, which costs time and money. Nonetheless, damages may remain in the glass that reduce its strength.

A great deal of time and money, limited design options – reason enough to develop a better, more effective process for separating glass. In a project funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Dr. Rainer Kübler has been working with his five-strong team on a laser-induced stress separation process for flat glass that causes minimal damage. Dr. Rainer Kübler has been awarded the Joseph-von-Fraunhofer Prize 2008 for his work.

Click on the link bellow to read the entire article.

600450 The crack as a tool
Date: 5 June 2008
Source: Fraunhofer

See more news about:

See more from these topics:

Others also read

The Spectus Vertical Sliding Sash is recognised as an industry leader not only in its authentic looks but also its performance and versatility.
Kolbe expands products and options with VistaLuxe complementary sliding patio doors and Madison handle sets.
LB Roof Windows has launched an exclusive new product with Liteleader a white painted roof window – offering builders, roofers, and installers the possibility to earn more margin on their projects.
Window and door system of the type “Harmonica” Е39.
Emplas has reported that it has now switched all new orders to Profile 22’s new Optima system ahead of manufacture from the beginning of July.
Stunning curved fenestration elements, supplied by Balconette, take full advantage of panoramic sea views at Art Deco-inspired seafront house at East Lothian on the north-east Scottish coast.

Add new comment