Worker crushed by falling glass panels dies

A man died from a ruptured heart after he was crushed by falling glass panels in a freak accident last Thursday. p> Mr Tan Lay Siew, 44, a general worker with a renovation company, had unloaded the panels onto a metal rack from a lorry outside his workplace in Geylang Bahru when the accident happened shortly after 1pm.His foot got caught in the metal rack and he fell backwards before the seven glass panels - each measuring about 1.7m by 1.7m - started toppling onto his body.Mr Tan was still conscious when his co-workers ran over to free him.

He was taken to Tan Tock Seng Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 3.30pm.

His grief-stricken widow, Madam Lim Choy Fong, 41, was struggling to cope with her loss when she spoke to The Sunday Times yesterday. The couple have a 17-year-old daughter and an 11-year-old son.

It was Madam Lim's daughter who rang to tell her that Mr Tan was in hospital.

Describing her husband as a devoted family man, Madam Lim said in Mandarin: 'I cannot believe that he had gone in such a manner. I never had a chance to say goodbye to him.'

600450 Worker crushed by falling glass panels dies glassonweb.com
Date: 27 September 2004
Source: Straitstimes Asia

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