St. Catharines company finalizes deal to buy West Virginia glass plant

A Canadian company has completed a deal that would reopen a glass plant in Lewis County. The former Glassworks plant in Weston closed last July after a grant it had been awarded by the state Economic Development Committee was delayed by a legal challenge to the grant process.

Earlier this month the West Virginia Economic Development Authority agreed to guarantee a $150,000 US loan for Capredoni LLC, which was formed by Capredoni Crystal of St. Catharines, Ontario.

The 77-year-old facility should be sufficiently renovated within a few months to allow the company to start making crystal giftware and other decorative glass.

The plant will be staffed by local hires. A work force with a knowledge of glassmaking was one of the big draws for the company, said Christopher Capredoni, the company's managing director.

"To put it bluntly, an opportunity fell into our lap and we couldn't pass it up," he said Wednesday.

The company eventually plans to employ about 25 people, Capredoni said.

600450 St. Catharines company finalizes deal to buy West Virginia glass plant glassonweb.com
Date: 30 April 2004
Source: Canada.com

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