This Glass Technique Is Hard To Say, Easy To View

Want to sound like a knowledgeable collector? Use an unfamiliar term, such as "matsu-no-ke" (pronounced "mat-sue-no-kay").

It is the name of a special type of three-dimensional hand-applied glass decoration.

Stevens & Williams, an English glassworks, used the technique in 1884. Semi-molten glass was shaped into branches, then applied to a glass vase. Because they were still hot, the glass branches became part of the glass of the vase.

Daisylike flowers, sometimes in a different color, were added. Special tools were used to press a pattern into the center of the flowers. The finished trim is clear glass and looks as if it could be carved ice.

The decoration was used in 1922 by Frederick Carder at the Steuben Glass Works. He had developed the decoration years earlier while working in England. A finished matsu-no-ke vase glistened with applied branches and flowers on a white or colored glass background.

Timely question

Question: We have an anniversary clock (the kind with a lift-off glass dome) that was given to my parents as a wedding gift in 1931. It's marked "Aug. Schatz & Sohne." The clock is in good condition and keeps perfect time. I'm curious about what it's worth today.

Answer: Aug. Schatz & Sohne was founded in Triburg, Germany, in 1881 and stayed in business until 1985. The company made anniversary clocks, also called 400-day clocks (because they could be wound to run for more than 365 days), as well as cuckoo, desk, electric and quartz clocks.

Read the entire news on the source link below.

600450 This Glass Technique Is Hard To Say, Easy To View glassonweb.com
Date: 19 February 2007
Source: Orlandosentinel.com

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